Browse Prior Art Database

Metering Dispense Head

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085465D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Corso, R: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The problem associated with encapsulating semiconductors which are bonded to pin-type substrate, is the difficulty in placing the encapsulant material to enclose and seal the pins without depositing a coating of the encapsulant material on the pins.

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Metering Dispense Head

The problem associated with encapsulating semiconductors which are bonded to pin-type substrate, is the difficulty in placing the encapsulant material to enclose and seal the pins without depositing a coating of the encapsulant material on the pins.

Shown in the drawing is a metering dispense head which can dispense an accurate shot size of encapsulant material on the substrates for sealing purposes, and which encapsulant material is free of air bubbles.

The apparatus 10 comprises a plurality of pistons 11 located in cylinders 12, each of the pistons includes a flange portion 13 which permits biasing the piston 11 upwardly by a spring 14 operating against the flange 13 and the upper portion of the housing 15. An extension 16 of the piston permits the setting of the piston 11 in the cylinder 12 by a micrometer type adjusting screw 17, in order that a predetermined volume of encapsulant material, such as epoxy, may be loaded into the cylinder 12. A yoke 18 may be actuated by a piston, not shown, to effect downward motion to the piston 11 by operation against the flange 13, causing the encapsulant material to be dispensed from the cylinder 12.

Intermediate the housing 15 and a manifold 19 is a shuttle plate 20 having four apertures, such as illustrated in Fig. 1A. The first aperture 21 is a fill aperture, the second aperture 22 is a dispense aperture and the third and fourth apertures 23 and 24 are combination fill and dispense apertures, whic...