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Capacitor Structure for Integrated Circuit Semiconductor Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085482D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 71K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ku, SM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In integrated circuit devices, it frequently becomes necessary to provide capacitors on the device. The presently known capacitor structures for incorporation on such devices normally employ diffused capacitors. Such capacitors are frequently nonlinear, are difficult to fabricate to narrow tolerances, and have unfavorable dissipation factors. The use of a hybrid-type structure, such as anodized Ta films, requires additional processes which are incompatible with the fabrication of integrated circuit device structures and requires relatively large areas.

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Capacitor Structure for Integrated Circuit Semiconductor Devices

In integrated circuit devices, it frequently becomes necessary to provide capacitors on the device. The presently known capacitor structures for incorporation on such devices normally employ diffused capacitors. Such capacitors are frequently nonlinear, are difficult to fabricate to narrow tolerances, and have unfavorable dissipation factors. The use of a hybrid-type structure, such as anodized Ta films, requires additional processes which are incompatible with the fabrication of integrated circuit device structures and requires relatively large areas.

In Figs. 1 and 2 are illustrated the capacitor structure which can be fabricated by porous silicon technology. In Fig. 1, monocrystalline lines 10 and 12 form the plates of a capacitor. Lines 10 and 12 can be of any suitable length to provide the desired capacitance. Relatively thin dielectric region 14 is the dielectric material defined by present optical or E-beam technology. Lines 10 and 12 are isolated from each other and the rest of the elements on the device by a silicon oxide material which surrounds the lines. In practice, suitable terminals and passivating layers, not shown, are provided.

In Fig. 2 is illustrated yet another embodiment of the capacitor. Monocrystalline region 16 doped with a suitable impurity forms one plate of a capacitor, while the underlying monocrystalline substrate 18 provides the second plate. Dielectric material 20 is...