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Browse Prior Art Database

Satin Finish Lamination

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085618D
Original Publication Date: 1976-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Doran, DE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A process is described for laminating printed-circuit boards and cards that display a surface completely free of the normal processing defects, such as epoxy dust, scratches, etc. The common method to laminate circuit panels is to stack copper and prepreg between highly polished steel planishing plates, and then to laminate the sandwich under heat and pressure.

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Satin Finish Lamination

A process is described for laminating printed-circuit boards and cards that display a surface completely free of the normal processing defects, such as epoxy dust, scratches, etc. The common method to laminate circuit panels is to stack copper and prepreg between highly polished steel planishing plates, and then to laminate the sandwich under heat and pressure.

Using this method it was not uncommon to have epoxy dust created by the prepreg settle on the copper and planishing plates such that when the lamination took place,, the epoxy dust was laminated in the copper surfaces and could cause shorts in the panel when circuitized. The surface polishing techniques designed to remove the epoxy dust often scratched the soft copper surface, causing opens to exist in the panel when circuitized.

The present method provides for the use of a heavy paper. such as kraft paper, to be cut with the copper foil so that it is against the external side of the foil. This copper and paper sandwich is then stacked in a normal lay up, the paper being between the copper foil and the planishing plate. The paper protects the copper from the epoxy dust and because of this, the surface polishing process is no longer necessary.

The paper stays with the laminate throughout all machining operations protecting the surface thereof from damage, and eliminating the possibility that shorts or opens will result when the surface is circuitized.

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