Browse Prior Art Database

Thick Wear Resistant Coating for Silicon Devices

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085645D
Original Publication Date: 1976-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Poponiak, MR: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A thick hard protective coating that can follow the contour of any silicon device surface is produced by forming a porous silicon layer on the surface to be protected, and then converting the layer to silicon oxide, silicon oxynitride, silicon nitride, or to silicon carbide. SI(3)N(4), SI(x)O(y)N(z) and SIC are preferred over SIO(2) in device applications that require more chemical inertness and higher hardness values.

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Thick Wear Resistant Coating for Silicon Devices

A thick hard protective coating that can follow the contour of any silicon device surface is produced by forming a porous silicon layer on the surface to be protected, and then converting the layer to silicon oxide, silicon oxynitride, silicon nitride, or to silicon carbide. SI(3)N(4), SI(x)O(y)N(z) and SIC are preferred over SIO(2) in device applications that require more chemical inertness and higher hardness values.

One possible problem encountered with silicon ink jet nozzles used in ink jet printers is an apparent "wear-out" due to the high-flow rate of the ink passing through the nozzle's orifice. A wear-resistant layer is produced on the surfaces of the nozzle's orifice in the following manner.

Orifice holes are formed in the silicon wafer 1 by existing methods such as, electrochemical etching, chemical etching, ion etching, etc. (Fig. 1). A porous silicon layer of desired depth is formed on the walls of the orifice hole (Fig. 2). The porous silicon is converted to SI(3)N(4), or SI(x)O(y)N(z), or SIC as desired (Fig. 3). Hard, more chemically inert uniform protective coatings are produced on hole surfaces irrespective of contour irregularities (Fig. 4).

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