Browse Prior Art Database

Gas Panel Assembly Fixture

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085672D
Original Publication Date: 1976-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Costa, MJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

In a conventional gas panel assembly and fabrication, prior to sealing and backfilling the panel, the assembly is baked out under vacuum at an elevated temperature to remove the gases from the interior surface of the plates. However, because of the close separation of the panel plates and the long mean free path of gas molecules at low pressures, gas purification is difficult to achieve. A method and fixture for providing a tubeless gas panel in which the bakeout operation is enhanced over conventional fabrication techniques operates as follows.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 70% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Gas Panel Assembly Fixture

In a conventional gas panel assembly and fabrication, prior to sealing and backfilling the panel, the assembly is baked out under vacuum at an elevated temperature to remove the gases from the interior surface of the plates. However, because of the close separation of the panel plates and the long mean free path of gas molecules at low pressures, gas purification is difficult to achieve.

A method and fixture for providing a tubeless gas panel in which the bakeout operation is enhanced over conventional fabrication techniques operates as follows.

Referring to the drawing, a gas panel comprises plates 1 and 3, plate 1 being mounted on a horizontal base 5 and plate 3 being angularly positioned on support number 7, the plates being relatively widely separated from each other. When this fixture is placed in an oven, bakeout occurs with the plates separated, enabling the gas molecules to leave the surfaces freely and not be trapped in a confined volume.

Following bakeout, the vacuum furnace 9, shown to the left of wall 11 is backfilled with the desired gas mixture and the linear motion feed-through 13 moved to the right, causing plate 3 of the panel to be lowered onto plate 1, thereby entrapping the required gas mixture inside the panel. The seal between plates 1 and 3 can be made with dielectric glass formed over the conductor arrays, or by a separate sealing glass frame placed in position before inserting the assembly into the furnace.

The...