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Improving Ink Absorption of Porous Structures

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085679D
Original Publication Date: 1976-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 2 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Edds, KE: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

During the process of printing with an ink jet mechanism, a fine mist is produced by the impact of ink drops on paper. This mist must be controlled and/or collected to prevent contamination of materials and parts used in the ink jet printing process.

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Improving Ink Absorption of Porous Structures

During the process of printing with an ink jet mechanism, a fine mist is produced by the impact of ink drops on paper. This mist must be controlled and/or collected to prevent contamination of materials and parts used in the ink jet printing process.

One method of collecting this mist is by absorption into a porous plastic or metal structure. However, the requirements for ink-absorbing structures to possess wetting capabilities for aqueous inks is frequently beyond the given material's ability. The high surface tension of the ink, necessary for droplet formation, does not allow for usual capillary transportation in most polymeric porous materials. Other materials, such as sintered stainless steel, operate marginally to absorb ink, and others require surface modification for increased wetting and absorbing ability.

A protective shield constructed of POREX* high-density polyethylene, 35 micron size, is made absorbant by the described treatment. A solution is made incorporating: 1. Surfactant.

2. Ink vehicle.

3. Solvents for surfactant and ink vehicle.

The part is immersed in the solution, air is evacuated to facilitate displacement within the capillary structure, then the part is dried to remove solvents.

The absorption rate, along with diffusion properties are dependent on the monolayer deposited within and on the material. The free pore space is reoccupied by air until displaced by absorbed ink.

The retained layer of...