Browse Prior Art Database

Transporting Deposit Material through a Vacuum Wall

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085739D
Original Publication Date: 1976-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-02
Document File: 3 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cuomo, JJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A vacuum chamber 10 is provided with a small hole 12 in its wall. This hole may have a collimating tube 14 attached to it, as shown in the figure. The hole forms a leak in the chamber 10 which is small enough for the pumps to maintain an adequately low pressure. A substrate 16 is located inside the vacuum chamber, near the hole 12 in the vacuum wall or the nozzle of the collimating tube 14.

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Transporting Deposit Material through a Vacuum Wall

A vacuum chamber 10 is provided with a small hole 12 in its wall. This hole may have a collimating tube 14 attached to it, as shown in the figure. The hole forms a leak in the chamber 10 which is small enough for the pumps to maintain an adequately low pressure. A substrate 16 is located inside the vacuum chamber, near the hole 12 in the vacuum wall or the nozzle of the collimating tube 14.

Outside the chamber 10, in air or some other more suitable gas, is a source of smoke 18 in a high-pressure region 20. Typical smoke particles contain about 10/7/ atoms. The smoke is allowed to drift past the hole 12, and part of it is sucked in. The smoke may be generated in a number of ways. For example, MgO smoke may be made by burning Mg in air. Also, gold smoke may be made by vaporizing the metal in argon.

Smoke is allowed to pass into the nozzle, carried by the gas flowing or leaking into the vacuum chamber 10. When the smoke enters the chamber 10, much of the carrier gas diffuses out of the beam but the colloid particles, on account of their relatively large mass, continue on the same straight line and form a deposit 22 on the substrate 16. If the substrate temperature is high, the colloid particles may flow and wet the substrate surface, forming a thin film. They may also sinter to one another to give a continuous deposit.

The low-pressure region where the substrate 16 sits can be energized with a negative charge on the substrate producing a discharge in the region of the substrate. Carrier gas (air, or inert gas argon neon, etc.) will be accelerated to the substrate, bombarding the depositing material as in ion plating. The particle will be charged and will also tend to be accelerated towards the substrate 16.

One advantage of this method is that material can be deposited onto a s...