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Browse Prior Art Database

Miniature Moving Alphnumeric Display

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085787D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ivancie, PT: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Utilizing a minimal number of 7 x 5 dot-matrix character positions, a moving display can be made to appear almost continuous as the characters move from right to left across the display, one column at a time. See Fig. 1 for basic display definitions.

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Miniature Moving Alphnumeric Display

Utilizing a minimal number of 7 x 5 dot-matrix character positions, a moving display can be made to appear almost continuous as the characters move from right to left across the display, one column at a time. See Fig. 1 for basic display definitions.

The control system for the display is shown in Fig. 2. In utilizing an X-Y addressing scheme to illuminate the individual dots in the display modules, a 64- bit shift register 3 propagates a single pulse to strobe each column successively from left to right on the display, while the character generator 5 applies forward bias to the row elements that are to be lit for those columns.

To make the display seem to shift to the left, the column strobes are delayed so that they occur one column later than they had on a previous cycle. In order to avoid having the first character appear in the last display position, one more character than there are display positions must be addressed, so that the last character can enter the display area gradually from the right side.

The column shifts must not occur after each and every complete strobe cycle or the characters will move too fast to be recognized. The shift speed control 7 allows a particular image to be lit without shifting for a programmable number of times, thereby slowing down the display movement so that it may be interpreted easily. The acceptable rate seems to lie between four and ten characters per second.

In order to keep the display from having an annoying flicker, a refresh rate of greater than about 100 times per second must be maintained: therefore, the column strobe rate must be 64 times higher than that. An actual clock rate tha...