Browse Prior Art Database

Standalone Maintenance Processor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085788D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 42K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Boucher, RK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Previously, it has been the practice to utilize small storage units of the magnetic disk type as input devices for loading programs into both central processing units (CPU) and input/output devices (I/O), which utilize internal microprocessing for control. However, these applications only use the disk storage device as a data base for either the operational code or diagnostic program codes.

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Standalone Maintenance Processor

Previously, it has been the practice to utilize small storage units of the magnetic disk type as input devices for loading programs into both central processing units (CPU) and input/output devices (I/O), which utilize internal microprocessing for control. However, these applications only use the disk storage device as a data base for either the operational code or diagnostic program codes.

The present arrangement, as shown in schematic form in the drawing, which represents the data flow for this standalone maintenance processor, uses the disk storage as a serial read-only storage which contains instructions to be executed by the disk file adapter. The disk file adapter can execute a limited set of instructions which control the disk file itself, and are also used to control and diagnose faults in a microprocessor in the associated I/O unit. This permits complete standalone maintenance with no requirements for other system resources, in order to diagnose failures in the associated I/O unit. Once the main I/O processor is tested, it is used to diagnose the remainder of the I/O unit, now using the disk file as a data base for the remaining diagnostic programs.

Basic data flow of the arrangement is shown in the drawing, where information is read from the storage disk by a read head 5 to an amplifier 7, an address mark detector or VFO unit 9, and thence to a serial-to-parallel converter 11, where the information is converted to parallel form. Under some circumstances, information from the I/O unit "Bus nut" is written on the disk via a "write serdes" 13.

From serdes...