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Monitoring of Industrial Waste Water System by Laser Sensing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085789D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kern, RW: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

The unique qualities of the essentially monochromatic light of high intensity and polarization available in laser light sources can be directly applied to monitor industrial waste water treatment facilities.

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Monitoring of Industrial Waste Water System by Laser Sensing

The unique qualities of the essentially monochromatic light of high intensity and polarization available in laser light sources can be directly applied to monitor industrial waste water treatment facilities.

A first application is found in the use of laser ranging to measure the clarifier precipitate blanket height. In the clarifier, the filtration bed includes a suspension of metal hydroxide particles in solution, which provides an upward filtration bed on top of which is relatively clear water effluent. The boundary between the top water effluent layer and the metal hydroxide precipitate blanket is very clearly defined, and it is found that the height of the metal hydroxide blanket plays an important role in the filtering of the waste material through the clarifier prior to discharge.

Accordingly, it is necessary to closely monitor the height of the metal hydroxide blanket to maintain the total filtration effect of the clarifier. This is accomplished by taking advantage of the relatively low reflectivity of the upper water layer in the clarifier and the high reflectivity of the boundary between the water layer and the metal hydroxide clarifier precipitate. A laser beam is directed toward the top of the clarifier at a suitable angle and a sensor is positioned a prescribed distance from the laser. Then through the use of simple geometry, it is possible to detect the angle of the highly reflected laser beam and determine the height of the clarifier blanket.

It has also been found that a laser system can effectively monitor on a continuous online basis the amount of total suspended solids released in water ...