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Circuit Device Testing by On Site Model

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000085870D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Jun-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 45K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Jeannotte, DA: AUTHOR

Abstract

The drawing shows a ceramic substrate 2 of the type that is conventionally used for supporting a semiconductor chip, a set of pins and electrical connections from the chip to the pins. During the development of such a circuit device, it is conventional to perform various electrical tests in simulated environments.

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Circuit Device Testing by On Site Model

The drawing shows a ceramic substrate 2 of the type that is conventionally used for supporting a semiconductor chip, a set of pins and electrical connections from the chip to the pins. During the development of such a circuit device, it is conventional to perform various electrical tests in simulated environments.

The time that is required for these tests can be shortened by increasing the operating voltage of the device and by increasing environmental factors such as temperature, humidity, and the concentration of contaminants. Unfortunately, the actual operating environment of the circuit device may include previously unsuspected contaminants that are not included in such a test.

The ceramic substrate 2 carries two circuits 3 and 4 that are constructed of metals that would be used in an actual device. The substrate 2 is plugged in to a circuit board, not shown, that carries circuits that apply a selected voltage to pads 6 through 12, and other circuits that record the time of occurrence of a short circuit between any of the three pads of circuit 3 and an open circuit between pads 9, 10 and pads 11, 12 of circuit 4. This model of an actual circuit device can be located where an actual circuit device might be expected to operate, and it can be checked by maintenance personnel to determine the length of time the circuit device operates before failure.

The devices are inexpensive and large numbers of the devices can be used a...