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Pulsed Light Source for Integrated Circuit Junction Leakage Testing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086018D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Souilliard, HR: AUTHOR

Abstract

Contactless methods for measuring the decay time of bulk semiconductor materials are known in the art. For example, the paper, "Contactless Measurement of Resistivity of Slices of Semiconductor Materials", by Nobuo Miyamoto et al, Review of Scientific Instruments, Vol. 38, No. 3, March 1967, p. 360, discloses a high-frequency capacitively coupled technique, whereas the paper, "Simple Contactless Method for Measuring Decay Time of Photoconductivity in Silicon", by R. M. Lichtenstein et al, Review of Scientific Instruments, Vol. 38, No. 1, January 1967, p. 133, deals with a high-frequency inductively coupled technique.

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Pulsed Light Source for Integrated Circuit Junction Leakage Testing

Contactless methods for measuring the decay time of bulk semiconductor materials are known in the art. For example, the paper, "Contactless Measurement of Resistivity of Slices of Semiconductor Materials", by Nobuo Miyamoto et al, Review of Scientific Instruments, Vol. 38, No. 3, March 1967, p. 360, discloses a high-frequency capacitively coupled technique, whereas the paper, "Simple Contactless Method for Measuring Decay Time of Photoconductivity in Silicon", by R. M. Lichtenstein et al, Review of Scientific Instruments, Vol. 38, No. 1, January 1967, p. 133, deals with a high-frequency inductively coupled technique.

Both techniques monitor the amplitude of oscillation of a high-frequency carrier which is capacitively or inductively coupled, respectively, to the semiconductor sample while the sample is irradiated with pulsed light. Each pulse of light excites electrical carriers which temporarily increase the loading on the high-frequency oscillator, and cause a corresponding temporary decrease in the amplitude of oscillations. When the light pulse terminates, the amplitude of oscillations returns to its steady state value at a rate determined by the carrier recombination rate of the irradiated sample.

Another method for inducing eddy currents in a semiconductor PN junction wafer, while irradiating the wafer with pulsed light of selected intensity, involves monitoring the oscillator loading due to the pulsed light modulated eddy-current losses and displaying the monitored data on an oscilloscope in the form...