Browse Prior Art Database

Dynamic Image Alignment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086076D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 50K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Auen, WJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This measurement method utilizes a computer driven image dissector television camera and an address transformation algorithm to dynamically correct for misalignment of the image of a part being tested.

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Dynamic Image Alignment

This measurement method utilizes a computer driven image dissector television camera and an address transformation algorithm to dynamically correct for misalignment of the image of a part being tested.

The method involves a measurement of the corner points of the object, then a calculation of the following parameters: the starting and ending points, a delta X per X, a delta X per Y, a delta Y per Y, and a delta Y per X. From these parameters, a plane surface of an object in any orientation can be treated as a mechanically aligned rectangle. In the example given, the object is a gas display panel having selectively energizable X, Y points.

Fig.1 shows an ideal alignment image of the panel to be tested. This image is coded into the program in terms of: 1. Starting point - The x and y coordinates of the primary reference point, as seen by the image dissector. All points to be tested will be referenced to this primary reference point. 2. Step size - The number of image dissector addresses between points to be tested. 3. End point The number of steps between the starting point and the alignment points.

All expected result test information can be written referencing the number of steps in x and y between the starting point and the test point. This method is applicable to objects of any shape, not simply a rectangle.

When the actual panel is mounted and moved into position under the image dissector, four reference points in the panel are turned on, Fig. 2. A computer- controlled scan finds and records the exact location of the reference points. Using these real coordinates, a table of essential values is created for calculation o...