Browse Prior Art Database

Hybrid Thin R W Head with Bonding by Laser Beam

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086146D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Jul-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hagopian, JJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

In Fig. 1, thin high-permeability films 1 and 2 are shown deposited onto ferrite pole pieces 3 and 4 to form hybrid pole pieces. A nonmagnetic material is deposited onto pole piece 4 to form the front gap 5 while a high-permeability film forms the back gap 6. Nonmagnetic pole faces 7 and 8 preferably of ceramic are bonded to the ferrite pole pieces 3 and 4 to support the thin film poles 1 and 2 and the gap 5, and to present a hard, long-wearing surface to the magnetic media, not shown. The concave profile of pole piece 3 and the notch in pole piece 4 is to accommodate the necessary winding.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 81% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Hybrid Thin R W Head with Bonding by Laser Beam

In Fig. 1, thin high-permeability films 1 and 2 are shown deposited onto ferrite pole pieces 3 and 4 to form hybrid pole pieces. A nonmagnetic material is deposited onto pole piece 4 to form the front gap 5 while a high-permeability film forms the back gap 6. Nonmagnetic pole faces 7 and 8 preferably of ceramic are bonded to the ferrite pole pieces 3 and 4 to support the thin film poles 1 and 2 and the gap 5, and to present a hard, long-wearing surface to the magnetic media, not shown. The concave profile of pole piece 3 and the notch in pole piece 4 is to accommodate the necessary winding.

The hybrid pole pieces can be bonded together by the use of pellets P heated by properly shaped laser beams. The laser beam causes the pellets, preferably glass, to melt and flow into the apex window to make fusion bonds. With ceramic pellets, having a considerably higher melting temperature, the laser beams would be directed at pellet-window points of contact to make spot fusion bonds.

Wedges W of bonding material can be positioned in straight sections of core window tapers to bond the pole pieces together, as shown in Fig. 2. For glass wedges, the laser beam heating causes the bonding material to flow into the apex regions similar to the pellets. For ceramic wedges the shaped or scanning laser beam is directed at lines of contact between the wedge W and the window sides to make line fusion bonds.

Channels can be machined into t...