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Wear Resistant Coating

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086186D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kehr, WD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Flame sprayed ceramics have been widely utilized to provide wear-resistant characteristics to numerous objects. The use of flame plated ceramics to provide a wear-resistant and protective coating to magnetic transducers is described in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 11, No. 10, March 1969, page 1199.

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Wear Resistant Coating

Flame sprayed ceramics have been widely utilized to provide wear-resistant characteristics to numerous objects. The use of flame plated ceramics to provide a wear-resistant and protective coating to magnetic transducers is described in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 11, No. 10, March 1969, page 1199.

Where a transducer is intended for use in at least occasional contact with a magnetic media, deterioration of the transducer or the coating on the transducer may be due to chemical as well as mechanical action. For example, assuming a situation in which a magnetic media has an overall basic character, then the media may cause chemical reaction with the head coating. However, such a reaction with the coating is reduced or stopped if the transducer is coated with a basic material. This basic quality is easily provided in a flame sprayed ceramic coating, for example, by the inclusion of an oxide of an alkali metal or an alkaline earth metal in the coated material. One exemplary composition consists of, by weight, 85% Al(2)O(3) - 10% MgO - 5% TiO(2) applied by plasma or flame spraying.

Other chemical constituents can be included in a coating to neutralize or compensate for other chemical reactions.

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