Browse Prior Art Database

Modular Power System Packaging

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086188D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 116K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Steenburgh, JL: AUTHOR

Abstract

Shown in the drawings is a modular power system (MPS). The traditional configuration of power supplies used in main frames has been that of packaging magnetic and electrical components in large metal boxes. Increased machine power requirements have placed severe limitations on the power box configuration, due to space limitations and accessibility. The machine dictates the power requirement and the allotted usable space for power packaging.

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Modular Power System Packaging

Shown in the drawings is a modular power system (MPS). The traditional configuration of power supplies used in main frames has been that of packaging magnetic and electrical components in large metal boxes. Increased machine power requirements have placed severe limitations on the power box configuration, due to space limitations and accessibility. The machine dictates the power requirement and the allotted usable space for power packaging.

The modular power system, as shown, features a functional partitioning scheme which is unique and adaptable for present day power systems.

Fig. 1 depicts a populated main frame 10 with field replaceable units (FRU). The dimensions of the FRU's are two units high and one unit high. The designer is free to choose whatever unit of measurement he desires. Also shown in Fig. 1 are discrete components, for example, transformers and fans. The main feature of this design is the logical fashion in which the power system is divided so that discrete components can be packaged in each FRU.

In a practical high-frequency power supply, various partitions or divisions are possible. For example, a regulator circuit which consists of three smaller circuits -- control, switch, and output. The successful partitioning of these three circuits depends on the hardware configuration selected. Ideally, each subcircuit becomes a FRU and is packaged in its own housing as required. A multipurpose support/ electrical interconnect structure is supplied to allow the incremental addition of these FRU's, until the exact power system is achieved to meet nearly any normal machine requirements.

In addition to subdividing by function, the following partitioning is possible. Cooling.

Some subcircuits contain, or are comprised of, temperature sensitive devices. Such devices, because of this concept, can be housed in a forced air column if desired (see Fig. 3). This packaging design has several advantages including optimization of head sink design, standardization, lower fan costs, and less failures. Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMG):

Noisy circuits can be isolated from sensitive circuits and special shielding/bonding treatment can be applied as required. The partitioning facilitates source suppression in the problem area and the interconnect cabling can be shielded and/or routed to obviate cross coupling. High-Failure Rate:

Some components and/or devices have a much higher failure rate than others. Therefore these devices should be packaged separately for easier repair or replacement. Safety:

Some circuits may carry hazardous...