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Circuit Line Deposition by Ink Jet Technology

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086224D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Eisenmann, DE: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Ink jet technology for use in high-speed data printers is well developed. This same technology can also be applied to other areas such as depositing fine line circuitry on an insulating substrate.

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Circuit Line Deposition by Ink Jet Technology

Ink jet technology for use in high-speed data printers is well developed. This same technology can also be applied to other areas such as depositing fine line circuitry on an insulating substrate.

Shown, in schematic form, is a conventional ink jet printer which includes a reservoir 10, a piezoelectric device 12, a nozzle 14, charge plate 16, deflection plates 18, and a workpiece 20. In a normal ink jet data printer, the reservoir is filled with ink. In this case, reservoir 10 is filled with molten metal, such as copper. The reservoir 10 is pressurized as in a conventional ink jet printer.

The action of the piezoelectric crystal 12 and the nozzle 14 produce a series of drops of molten metal. These drops are electrostatically charged by element 16 and appropriately deflected by element 18, so that any desired pattern of molten drops can be placed on workpiece
20.

In the normal ink jet printer, the paper is stationery and the ink jet head moves. In the device shown above, it is advantageous to have the ink jet apparatus stationery and the workpiece mounted on an X-Y table such that it can be moved in the appropriate pattern, so that the drops of molten metal form the desired circuit pattern.

Printed circuits can also be fabricated by flame or plasma spraying conductive material through an electrostatic or magnetic focusing field.

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