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Truncating Glass Rods and Fibers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086234D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 25K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Narken, B: AUTHOR

Abstract

Typically, the ends of small diameter glass rods, such as spacer rods for gas panels, are jagged, split, or have very sharp edges, which results from the process of cutting. This condition often results in small chips of glass coming loose during handling or assembly, particularly when a compressive force is applied on the ends (radial). In this method a continuous glass rod (fiber) is simultaneously cut to desired lengths with smoothly tapered ends.

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Truncating Glass Rods and Fibers

Typically, the ends of small diameter glass rods, such as spacer rods for gas panels, are jagged, split, or have very sharp edges, which results from the process of cutting. This condition often results in small chips of glass coming loose during handling or assembly, particularly when a compressive force is applied on the ends (radial). In this method a continuous glass rod (fiber) is simultaneously cut to desired lengths with smoothly tapered ends.

The method consists of feeding the glass rod 1 through a narrow, small diameter heating coil 2 (Fig. 1). A narrow section of glass rod 1 is heated by coil 2 to a temperature below the softening temperature of the glass. Glass rod 1 is put in tension to cause a slight necking down of glass rod 1 (Fig. 2), and eventually a clean break occurs when the tensile strength of the necked down section 3 is exceeded (Fig. 3). The tail which typically results when separating glass by heating does not occur. Instead, a clean break is obtained. The applied tension force on glass rod 1 should be a maximum, but less than that which will cause failure of rod 1 at room temperature, or a premature break before required necking down has occurred.

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