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Impact Sound Stressing Fixture for Irregularly Shaped Samples

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086262D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dessauer, RG: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Impact sound stressing, ISS, is a mechanical acoustical technique to damage in a known and controlled manner objects, such as semiconductor wafers. Semiconductor wafers are subject to ISS on their back sides before semiconductor processing steps. The technique improves the performance of all semiconductor devices made in the ISS subjected wafers.

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Impact Sound Stressing Fixture for Irregularly Shaped Samples

Impact sound stressing, ISS, is a mechanical acoustical technique to damage in a known and controlled manner objects, such as semiconductor wafers. Semiconductor wafers are subject to ISS on their back sides before semiconductor processing steps. The technique improves the performance of all semiconductor devices made in the ISS subjected wafers.

The figure illustrates how irregularly shaped samples 10 are impact sound stressed by waxing them to the underside of a carrier membrane 11, such as spring steel, which is mounted above the driver membrane 12. The sample 10 is mounted in a high-impact region and the impact medium, not shown, for example, small tungsten spheres, is projected upward against the sample by the driver membrane 12.

The driver membrane 12 is mounted semipermanently on the sound tube flange 13, which can be metal. The upper membrane 11 with the samples 10 is held in place by a clamping ring 14 and three spring clips 15. The clips are swung aside for fast and easy removal and installation of samples. The speaker, not shown, projects sound through the sound tube 16 to the driver membrane 12.

Alternatively, the sample 10 may be held to the carrier membrane 11 by suction rather than wax. In this embodiment a hole is placed central in the sample carrier membrane 11. A small plastic suction cup with a hole at its center is connected by light TYGON* tubing to a vacuum pump. Sample mounting i...