Browse Prior Art Database

Manufacturing Preformed Dielectric Sheets With Components

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086288D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 65K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Scarafino, AJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In the manufacture of gas panels, a substrate containing conductive lines is covered with a layer of dielectric glass which is then heated to effect reflow of the glass. This layer contains, conventionally, at precise locations a large number of parts, for example spacer elements, which will assure a uniform gap in the panel assembly once the back and front cover plates are sealed together. To avoid the process step of laying down a layer of dielectric glass, it may be desirable to provide the glass in a single or sectionalized preform which may then be heated to effect reflow.

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Manufacturing Preformed Dielectric Sheets With Components

In the manufacture of gas panels, a substrate containing conductive lines is covered with a layer of dielectric glass which is then heated to effect reflow of the glass. This layer contains, conventionally, at precise locations a large number of parts, for example spacer elements, which will assure a uniform gap in the panel assembly once the back and front cover plates are sealed together. To avoid the process step of laying down a layer of dielectric glass, it may be desirable to provide the glass in a single or sectionalized preform which may then be heated to effect reflow.

An example of a preform is shown in Fig. 1. The sheet comprises a mixture of fritted glass containing a thermoplastic powder that has been heated during the process to obtain mechanical properties sufficient for handling. While the fusion of the binder particles may also be achieved by use of solvents, it may be advantageous to rely solely on the thermoplastic property of the binder. The thickness of the final reflowed dielectric coat can be controlled either by the mass per unit area of the frit-binder mixture, or by varying the frit-to-binder powder ratio.

The preform, as shown in Fig. 1, may be used over the conductive lines of the plates and then heated to cause reflow of the glass. In this connection then, the preform should be sintered to less than a hundred percent density, in order to prevent entrapment of gas which is gener...