Browse Prior Art Database

Alloy for Control of Copper Deposition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086299D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Anderson, LC: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

U.S. Patent 3,837,724 discloses a method for the fabrication of a gaseous discharge display device, which includes forming parallel conductors on glass substrates that are then overcoated with a dielectric material. The preferred embodiment on the conductor material was chrome-copper-chrome metallurgy in which a bottom layer of chrome was used for adherence to the glass, and an upper layer of chrome over the copper conductor was used to protect the copper conductor against attack by the active glass frit during reflow of the dielectric. The layers were individually evaporated to form metallic films which were then photoetched to form the desired line pattern.

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Alloy for Control of Copper Deposition

U.S. Patent 3,837,724 discloses a method for the fabrication of a gaseous discharge display device, which includes forming parallel conductors on glass substrates that are then overcoated with a dielectric material. The preferred embodiment on the conductor material was chrome-copper-chrome metallurgy in which a bottom layer of chrome was used for adherence to the glass, and an upper layer of chrome over the copper conductor was used to protect the copper conductor against attack by the active glass frit during reflow of the dielectric. The layers were individually evaporated to form metallic films which were then photoetched to form the desired line pattern.

In order to maintain electrical panel characteristics, it is essential that the line quality and particularly the line width be uniform, since the line width is a function of the panel operating voltage. However, in etching the copper conductors, the etching was too fast so that the line quality was adversely affected. The described process slows down the etching by alloying the copper with an element which tends to retard the process.

In one preferred embodiment, an alloy of copper-titanium varying between 2 and 30 percent titanium by weight was employed. resulting in a slower film etch with greater line width control. The alloy had no adverse effect on the conductive capabilities of the copper conductor.

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