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Browse Prior Art Database

Magnetic Laser Modulator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086376D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Aug-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 37K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chastang, JC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In a publication entitled "Magneto-Optic Laser Polarization Modulator", the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 18, No. 10, March 1976, pages 3506 and 3507, J. C. Chastang and R. E. Horstmann describe a magnetic modulator for a gas laser, wherein two orthogonally disposed electromagnetic fields are placed in the laser tube such that when either one of the electromagnetic fields is activated, the laser beam becomes polarized and the plane of polarization is in the plane of the applied magnetic field. A polarizer is oriented with respect to the output beam so that when the electromagnet is on, laser light goes through the polarizer and, when the other field is on, light is stopped by the polarizer.

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Magnetic Laser Modulator

In a publication entitled "Magneto-Optic Laser Polarization Modulator", the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 18, No. 10, March 1976, pages 3506 and 3507, J. C. Chastang and R. E. Horstmann describe a magnetic modulator for a gas laser, wherein two orthogonally disposed electromagnetic fields are placed in the laser tube such that when either one of the electromagnetic fields is activated, the laser beam becomes polarized and the plane of polarization is in the plane of the applied magnetic field. A polarizer is oriented with respect to the output beam so that when the electromagnet is on, laser light goes through the polarizer and, when the other field is on, light is stopped by the polarizer.

Described is a more simple version of a magnetic laser modulator using the transversal Zeeman effect.

Referring to the Figs. 1 and 2, a laser is shown equipped with Brewster windows 10 and 12. Such a laser will produce a beam whose polarization vector is parallel to the plane defined by the axis 14 of the laser and the normals to the Brewster windows 16 and 18. Assume that a uniform magnetic field of sufficient intensity is applied perpendicularly (a) to the axis of the laser, (b) to the polarization plane defined previously. The polarization vector of the beam 20 will now tend to become parallel to the direction of the magnetic field, as described in the reference.

However, in doing so the reflection losses at the Brewster windows will incre...