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Low Temperature Epitaxial Deposition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086429D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chu, WK: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Low-temperature silicon epitaxial growth from the solid phase wherein there is first a low-temperature deposition of amorphous silicon on a silicon substrate followed by an annealing step, wherein the amorphous layer is recrystallized to monocrystalline silicon is under consideration in the art. The prime advantage of such a structure is that high-temperature epitaxial processing steps are avoided. Consequently, out-diffusion is decreased considerably, thereby opening the door to multilayered epitaxial structures as well as very thin epitaxial layers. The main problem of this process is the formation of an undesirable native silicon dioxide layer between the amorphous and silicon substrate.

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Low Temperature Epitaxial Deposition

Low-temperature silicon epitaxial growth from the solid phase wherein there is first a low-temperature deposition of amorphous silicon on a silicon substrate followed by an annealing step, wherein the amorphous layer is recrystallized to monocrystalline silicon is under consideration in the art. The prime advantage of such a structure is that high-temperature epitaxial processing steps are avoided. Consequently, out-diffusion is decreased considerably, thereby opening the door to multilayered epitaxial structures as well as very thin epitaxial layers. The main problem of this process is the formation of an undesirable native silicon dioxide layer between the amorphous and silicon substrate.

In principle, solid phase epitaxial growth can be achieved at low temperatures (400 degrees - 600 degrees C) in a structure of amorphous silicon deposited on a silicon substrate crystal in the absence of an interfacial barrier, such as native thermal silicon oxide. The driving force for the growth is the reduction of the free energy from the amorphous to the crystalline state. Demonstration of this type of low-temperature epitaxial growth using a metal film as a buffer between the substrate and the amorphous film has been reported by C. Canali et al, Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 46, No. 7, July 1975, pp. 2831 - 2835. The metal film serves the purpose of providing a clean interface through silicide formation. In addition, this silicide s...