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H/2/ Promoted Plasma Polymerization of Saturated Fluorocarbons

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086527D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Coburn, JW: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The formation of thin continuous films by plasma polymerization is a well-established technique. Fluorocarbon films, formed by this method, have potential applications as dielectrics and as passivating layers. In most cases these fluorocarbon films have been formed using tetrafluoroethylene (C(2)F(4)) as a monomer gas. Other unsaturated fluorocarbons such as octafluorocyclobutane and perfluoro-2-butene have been used occasionally. When tetrafluoromethane (CF(4)) is used as a monomer gas, no polymerization occurs and, in fact, etching of some materials takes place (plasma etching). A similar effect has been observed for hexafluoroethane (C(2)F(6)).

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H/2/ Promoted Plasma Polymerization of Saturated Fluorocarbons

The formation of thin continuous films by plasma polymerization is a well- established technique. Fluorocarbon films, formed by this method, have potential applications as dielectrics and as passivating layers. In most cases these fluorocarbon films have been formed using tetrafluoroethylene (C(2)F(4)) as a monomer gas. Other unsaturated fluorocarbons such as octafluorocyclobutane and perfluoro-2-butene have been used occasionally. When tetrafluoromethane (CF(4)) is used as a monomer gas, no polymerization occurs and, in fact, etching of some materials takes place (plasma etching). A similar effect has been observed for hexafluoroethane (C(2)F(6)).

We have now found that when H(2) is added to either CF(4) or C(2)F(6) in a glow discharge, the etching behavior stops and polymerization does take place at rates compatible with many thin-film deposition requirements. The effect of the H(2) is to combine with fluorine to form the very stable HF molecule which is not expected to be involved in the polymerization process. The net result of this reaction of hydrogen with fluorine is to increase the degree of unsaturation of the remaining fluorocarbon. It is suspected that unsaturation is necessary for the plasma polymerization process to occur.

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