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Automated Use of a Theoretical System Description in Practical Testing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086558D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Cork, RM: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In an article entitled "General Purpose Interactive System Evaluation Tool", by C. D. Allen, J. L. Campbell, R. Cork, M. Gatrell and L. K. Griffiths appearing in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 19, No.2, July 1976, pp. 694-696, there is described a method of testing an interactive system comprising three main functions, a theoretical machine, a next input generator and a complementary machine. More detail on the operation of theoretical machine is provided below.

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Automated Use of a Theoretical System Description in Practical Testing

In an article entitled "General Purpose Interactive System Evaluation Tool", by C. D. Allen, J. L. Campbell, R. Cork, M. Gatrell and L. K. Griffiths appearing in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 19, No.2, July 1976, pp. 694-696, there is described a method of testing an interactive system comprising three main functions, a theoretical machine, a next input generator and a complementary machine. More detail on the operation of theoretical machine is provided below.

A description of the expected system behaviour is entered into the system, in the form of a transition table, as known in the theory of finite state machines. When the next input generator produces a new input for the system under test, this input and the current state of the system determine the output that should be produced. This expected output is determined, at the time the input becomes available, by a program operating with the system description and the known system state. This expected output is then compared with the actual output. Differences are reported in an error log, and used by the generator to modify the next inputs appropriately. The input and the known current state also determines the next state; the program also computes it, and uses it as the new current state. Thus, an initial input and a current state, corresponding to the starting state of the actual system, enables the current state to be determi...