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Browse Prior Art Database

Automatically Generating Efficient Testing Sequences for Interactive Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086559D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 34K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gatrell, M: AUTHOR

Abstract

In an article entitled "General Purpose Interactive System Evaluation Tool", by C. D. Allen, J. L. Campbell, R. Cork, M. Gatrell and L. K. Griffiths, appearing in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 19, No. 2, July 1976, pp. 694-696, there is described a method of testing an interactive system comprising three main functions, a theoretical machine, a next input generator and a complimentary machine. This article describes in more detail the operation of the next input generator.

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Automatically Generating Efficient Testing Sequences for Interactive Systems

In an article entitled "General Purpose Interactive System Evaluation Tool", by C. D. Allen, J. L. Campbell, R. Cork, M. Gatrell and L. K. Griffiths, appearing in the IBM Technical Disclosure Bulletin, Vol. 19, No. 2, July 1976, pp. 694-696, there is described a method of testing an interactive system comprising three main functions, a theoretical machine, a next input generator and a complimentary machine. This article describes in more detail the operation of the next input generator.

Automatic generation of test inputs for an interactive system is generally either random, or follows a predetermined sequence based on the expected system response. The random method can produce highly repetitive tests, if many different inputs give similar responses. Predetermined sequences may be largely invalidated, if an erroneous response occurs early in the system. The method described below overcomes both these disadvantages.

The action of an interactive system may be described as that of a finite state machine, having a number of distinct internal states on which the output given in response to a particular input may depend. Given a knowledge of the current state and a description of the system in these terms, the set of states which can be attained by giving a single input can be determined. Also, given an output in response to a given input, a set of states which could have been attained on prod...