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Testing a Multilevel Line Structure for Shorts

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086563D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 39K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hoekstra, JP: AUTHOR

Abstract

This structure permits testing for a faulty crossover in a multilevel interconnected conductive line structure, mapping its location and, if necessary, eliminating the malfunction.

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Testing a Multilevel Line Structure for Shorts

This structure permits testing for a faulty crossover in a multilevel interconnected conductive line structure, mapping its location and, if necessary, eliminating the malfunction.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, a metal pad is located between the x and y lines at the crossover point and electrically insulated from either line for the purpose of determining the condition of each crossover. During testing, all x and y lines are connected together. In certain patterns, the x line pair and y line pair are connected together with the bypass conductor. An electron beam with small enough diameter is used to hit the exposed part of the metal pad.

If a short exists at a crossover and the location of the beam is known, then a signal can be picked up from the x-y line configuration. When both x and y lines are connected together, this measurement cannot distinguish whether the crossover is shorting the x line to the y line or the x line or y line to the pad. Examining the x and y lines separately, it can be determined whether the two lines are shorted together through the pad or whether one of the lines is shorted to the pad only. In cases where each crossover has a bypass connector, the number of apparent shorts may increase by a factor of two due to the fact that the metal pad is looking at two possible shorts, one to insulate it from the x line and one to insulate it from the y line. The probability that the x line and y line a...