Browse Prior Art Database

Interfacing a Computer to a Telephone Exchange

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086585D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Sep-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 5 page(s) / 135K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Soo, SS: AUTHOR

Abstract

A computer interfaced to telephone company (TELCO) switching facilities greatly enhances the versatility of the communication system by enabling it to perform special automatic switching functions that are beyond the capability of standard TELCO facilities.

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Interfacing a Computer to a Telephone Exchange

A computer interfaced to telephone company (TELCO) switching facilities greatly enhances the versatility of the communication system by enabling it to perform special automatic switching functions that are beyond the capability of standard TELCO facilities.

Among the special automatic functions which a computer-assisted telephone system can readily handle are the following:

1. Automatically forward all calls from a given extension to one or more alternate extensions whose numbers have been designated before-hand by the called party, or, alternatively, forward such calls only when the called extension is busy or does not answer within a designated time.

2. Place a recorded message on the line when a given extension is called.

3. Set up a conference call automatically among three or more extensions whose numbers are designated.

4. For a long distance call, determine which part of the route (if any) can be provided by a private network of lower-cost lines leased from TELCO. If the call destination can be reached only through a public local line at the higher message tariff service (MTS) rate, then ascertain whether the call can be routed through the private leased network to a point close enough to its destination so that it can be completed as though it were a local-origin MTS call. Where the private network comprises various types of leased lines having different costs or rates, such as tie lines, WATS lines and FX lines, select automatically from among the presently available types of leased lines the routing which will result in the minimum charge for that call (least-cost routing). In the event that none of the leased lines is available at this particular instant, place the call in a queue for a designated time interval, then route the call through the public network.

5. Monitor and keep a charge record of calls, made through both private and public networks, for administrative purposes.

Fig. 1 is a general schematic showing of a computer-assisted private telephone exchange in which a computer 10 and interface switch 12 common to all of the trunks, are interposed between the incoming and outgoing trunks of the system. Each incoming trunk is connected to an individual voice connecting arrangement (VCA), such as 14, which has control-path and voice-path connections to the computer 10 and switch 12, respectively. Each outgoing trunk is similarly coupled through an individual VCA to computer 10 and switch 12. The interface switch 12, which makes voice connections between incoming and outgoing VCA's, is under the control of computer 10. A failsafe strapping arrangement (not shown) is provided to establish direct connections between incoming and outgoing VCA's in the event the computer goes down.

Any suitable call coding system may be employed for enabling the computer to distinguish between different kinds of calls originating within the exchange. An exemplary coding system is shown in t...