Browse Prior Art Database

Zero Clearance Hinge

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086592D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Habermehl, RW: AUTHOR

Abstract

For small machine covers or electronic gates that are pivotally supported on machine frames, there is a need for low-cost hinges that have little sidewise looseness. This hinge meets these requirements and can be used for lightweight applications. As shown, a movable part 1 is to be pivotally attached to a fixed frame part 2. A pair of arms 3 are attached to part 1 and a corresponding pair of arms 4 are secured to frame 2, with an internal spacing equal to the internal spacing of arms 3 or greater than the outside dimension of arms 3 by a small amount 5, depending on whether the arms 3 and 4 alternate or arms 4 are wholly outside of arms 3. Screws 6 connect each arm 3 to its adjacent arm 4 for pivotal movement.

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Zero Clearance Hinge

For small machine covers or electronic gates that are pivotally supported on machine frames, there is a need for low-cost hinges that have little sidewise looseness. This hinge meets these requirements and can be used for lightweight applications. As shown, a movable part 1 is to be pivotally attached to a fixed frame part 2.

A pair of arms 3 are attached to part 1 and a corresponding pair of arms 4 are secured to frame 2, with an internal spacing equal to the internal spacing of arms 3 or greater than the outside dimension of arms 3 by a small amount 5, depending on whether the arms 3 and 4 alternate or arms 4 are wholly outside of arms 3. Screws 6 connect each arm 3 to its adjacent arm 4 for pivotal movement.

A hole 7 is drilled and tapped in arm 4 to be a good close fit for screw 6 to permit the screw to turn in it without substantial friction. A hole 8 is drilled in arm 3, but is not tapped. When the hinge is assembled, screw 6 is screwed into hole 7 and is then forced into hole 8 to self-tap its own threads in a tight fit. A jam nut 9 is then tightened on the projecting end of screw 6 to secure it tightly in arm 3. As the hinge is opened, screw 6 will rotate in arm 4 and will raise arm 3 and the gate 1 slightly. The clearance 5 will accommodate this movement and should be about equal to or less than 1/2 of the pitch of screw 6, depending on the angle that gate 1 is to open through. Such a hinge is easily assembled and quite inexpensive t...