Browse Prior Art Database

Telephone Identifier Interface

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086611D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 72K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brady, RL: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This interface allows an IBM System/7 Toll Ticketing System to communicate with an Automatic Number Identifier (ANI). In telephone applications, it is desirable to automatically identify the calling subscriber number when he places a long distance call, eliminating the need for an operator to intervene in approximately 80% of the long distance calls placed. When the IBM Toll Ticketing System utilizes the existing central office ANI, an interfacing mechanism is required if the existing OEM data registers are retained for additional office capacity.

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Telephone Identifier Interface

This interface allows an IBM System/7 Toll Ticketing System to communicate with an Automatic Number Identifier (ANI). In telephone applications, it is desirable to automatically identify the calling subscriber number when he places a long distance call, eliminating the need for an operator to intervene in approximately 80% of the long distance calls placed. When the IBM Toll Ticketing System utilizes the existing central office ANI, an interfacing mechanism is required if the existing OEM data registers are retained for additional office capacity.

The IBM Toll Ticketing System 1 (Fig. 1) uses a totally software-driven multiplexer 2 and one of several hardware adapter 3 (interface) designs to accomplish these functions. The hardware adapter 3 significantly off-loads the software due to the critical response times required by ANI 4. The adapter also allows the IBM Toll Ticketing System to be placed anywhere in the central office priority logic since all OEM points used are external connections requiring no modification to the OEM data registers 6.

In a typical call sequence, the calling subscriber 8 dials the called number using Direct Distance Dialing (1+DDD). Central office equipment 9 provides the path through the office to reach the called subscriber 10 after a billable number has been secured.

The ANI 4, upon request, will set up to identify a single calling subscriber at that point in time. The control of ANI 4 is via the queueing in the OEM data registers 6 and interface adapter 3.

When the queue progresses to interface adapter 3, the interface adapter blocks the OEM data registers 6, starts the ANI 4, and passes data to multiplexer 2 under control of the Toll Ticketing System.

The Toll Ticketing System, upon recognition and validation of the calling number as a legitimate number, allows the call to proceed and finally connects the subscribers.

Figs. 2 and 3 illustrate circuits that allow the IBM System/7 to interface to a Stromberg-Carlson Model 45 Automatic Number Identifier. The System/7 requires an interface, controlled by only one digital input (DI) point and one or two digital output (DO) points, to activate this unit in offices equipped with this level of ANI equipment. The ANI unit, however, requires the control of five leads to bid for and hold the...