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Fabricating Glass Cellular DSDT Targets

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086655D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 58K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pickar, PB: AUTHOR

Abstract

Targets for certain deformographic storage display tubes (DSDT) include a thin metallic deformable conductive member 8 (Fig. 5), which is under tension and stretched over one surface of a thin glass or other dielectric member 1. Member 1 has an array of holes H passing through it. Adjacent the opposite side of member 1 is another glass member 6, which has a manifold M with a series of "breather" holes B. Member 6 insures that no air or other gas is entrapped in the target when the latter is being fabricated into the DSDT envelope. In operation, the deformable metallic member 8 deforms in response to the electrostatic charge pattern placed and stored on the opposite side of the target by the electron beam from the tube's gun G.

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Fabricating Glass Cellular DSDT Targets

Targets for certain deformographic storage display tubes (DSDT) include a thin metallic deformable conductive member 8 (Fig. 5), which is under tension and stretched over one surface of a thin glass or other dielectric member 1. Member 1 has an array of holes H passing through it. Adjacent the opposite side of member 1 is another glass member 6, which has a manifold M with a series of "breather" holes B. Member 6 insures that no air or other gas is entrapped in the target when the latter is being fabricated into the DSDT envelope. In operation, the deformable metallic member 8 deforms in response to the electrostatic charge pattern placed and stored on the opposite side of the target by the electron beam from the tube's gun G.

One method of fabricating such a target includes providing a circular glass member 1 (Fig. 1) of diameter D1 having upper and lower surfaces 2 and 3 with a sufficient thickness T1, e.g., 75 microns. The periphery of surface 3 is affixed to a tantalum ring 4 using an a appropriate sealant, e.g., frit F, epoxy, or polymer. After curing, member 1 is under tension because of the differences in the coefficients of expansion of member 1 and ring 4.

Next, a layer of photoresist (not shown) is applied to surface 2 and exposed through a suitable mask (not shown) to register the desired hole-array configuration to be provided in the target. If desired, a layer (not shown) of copper of appropriate thickness, e.g., a few microns, may be first placed on the surface 2 and the photoresist layer then applied over the metal layer. In either case, the holes H are then formed (Fig. 2) in the member 1 to a depth T2, e.g., 6 microns, which is equivalent to the desired final thickness of the member 1, by chemical etching or, to a greater depth, by ion milling.

After an appropriate cleaning, photoresist 5 is flowed onto the surface 2 and into the holes H and then cured (Fig. 3). Member 1 is then inverted and mounted on support S of a glass container C which in turn is mounted to a rotary table T. Etchant E is next placed in the space formed within the ring 4 and adjacent to surface 3. Table T is oscillated at a controlled rate and time period about axis A to provide a uniform etching of the member 1 to the desired planar level which intersects holes H. The...