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Palladium Plating Process

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086663D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Saxenmeyer, GJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The substitution of palladium for gold on connector pins can result in substantial cost savings. A process for electroplating palladium from an aqueous ammoniacal solution of palladosammine chloride is tailored primarily for use with barrel plating of palladium on nickel or nickel alloys for use as an electrical contact surface. However, it can be adapted to plating on any conductive substrate employing either barrel or rack plating procedures.

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Palladium Plating Process

The substitution of palladium for gold on connector pins can result in substantial cost savings. A process for electroplating palladium from an aqueous ammoniacal solution of palladosammine chloride is tailored primarily for use with barrel plating of palladium on nickel or nickel alloys for use as an electrical contact surface. However, it can be adapted to plating on any conductive substrate employing either barrel or rack plating procedures.

The palladium bath includes 20 to 30 grams per liter of palladosammine chloride with 50 to 150 grams per liter of ammonium chloride. In addition, there are 20 to 30 grams per liter of ammonium sulfate and between 50 and 75 cc per liter of ammonium hydroxide. The solution is maintained at a pH of 8.8 to 9.3 and is plated with a current density of 1 to 3 amps per square foot for barrel plating and with a current density between 5 and 25 amps per square foot for rack plating. With this process, there is a high conducting salt content in the bath with a high chloride to sulfate ratio.

To enhance the plating of the palladium on the substrate, a pretreatment cycle includes a hot alkaline clean, a concentrated hydrochloric acid dip, a 1:1 hydrochloric acid dip and a 20% sulfuric acid cathodic electroactivation at about 20 amps per square foot. This is accomplished by cycling the parts to be plated through a series of the above steps for a suitable period of time with a water rinse after each operation.

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