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Magnetic Stripe Reader/Writer With Improved Head Suspension

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086739D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mueller, HJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

Fig. 1 is a side view of a reader/writer for magnetic cards 2. The cards are carried on a support 3 and the card to be read or written is positioned over an opening 4 in the support. A magnetic head 5 is connected to a linear motor 6 to be driven through a horizontal stroke to read or write a card. An improved suspension keeps gap 8 of head 5 accurately aligned with the card in spite of variations in flatness and parallelism of the card backup plate (not shown).

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Magnetic Stripe Reader/Writer With Improved Head Suspension

Fig. 1 is a side view of a reader/writer for magnetic cards 2. The cards are carried on a support 3 and the card to be read or written is positioned over an opening 4 in the support. A magnetic head 5 is connected to a linear motor 6 to be driven through a horizontal stroke to read or write a card. An improved suspension keeps gap 8 of head 5 accurately aligned with the card in spite of variations in flatness and parallelism of the card backup plate (not shown).

Fig. 2 is an isometric view of the head 5, a holder 7 for the head, parts 9, 10 and 11 that are fixed to the motor shaft, and the head suspension system. The suspension system includes an upper Y-shaped flat spring 12 and two lower wire springs 13 and 14. An adjustable spring 15 (Fig. 1) is mounted on part 11 to support head 5 vertically. The system of springs 12, 13 and 14 permits the head to rise and fall, as the arrows in Fig. 2 represent. The head can rise on one side and fall on the other to twist with irregularities in the card surface. These motions maintain the air gap 8 parallel for read or write operations on the card. The suspension resists other motions in the head.

Spring 12 may be made of two layers of metal which are joined by a plastic adhesive that provides damping of spring oscillations.

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