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Echo Storage Device Utilizing Powders

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086803D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Oct-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 22K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lean, EG: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

"Echo" storage of radiofrequency (RF) signals has been observed in piezoelectric and magnetoelastic powders. However, in a given powder sample only small amounts of information can be stored because there is no convenient means for separately addressing different regions of the powder. It is suggested that surface acoustic waves be used in a manner analogous to their use in bulk wave and surface wave overlay devices.

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Echo Storage Device Utilizing Powders

"Echo" storage of radiofrequency (RF) signals has been observed in piezoelectric and magnetoelastic powders. However, in a given powder sample only small amounts of information can be stored because there is no convenient means for separately addressing different regions of the powder. It is suggested that surface acoustic waves be used in a manner analogous to their use in bulk wave and surface wave overlay devices.

The figure illustrates a surface wave device consisting of a piezoelectric substrate 1 (e.g., LiNbO(3)), a transducer 2 deposited on the substrate, a plane electrode 3 spaced above the substrate, the powdered storage medium 4 situated between the electrode and substrate 1, and input electrical circuits 5 and 6 connected to the transducer 2 and electrode 3, respectively.

For operation of this device as a memory, digital pulses modulated into an RF carrier are inserted through circuit 5 to transducer 2 and propagate as surface acoustic waves in substrate 1. When the information train occupies the whole space under the electrode 3, a short RF pulse, of the same frequency as the acoustic carrier, is applied to the electrode 3. The information train is then stored in the powder 4, and may be read out by subsequently pulsing either the electrode 3 or transducer 2 to obtain the output at the opposite port. Operation may also proceed by interchanging the input signals, i.e., by applying the information pulse sequence to...