Browse Prior Art Database

Volumetric 3D Display

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086865D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 116K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Martin, M: AUTHOR

Abstract

This apparatus forms a large volumetric 3D graphics display by projecting a small volumetric display onto a large screen that is moving with inherent synchronization with the small 3D image. A coherent bundle of fiber optics transforms digitized data from a line to a plane, and each plane is projected by lens to a screen that traverses a larger volume.

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Volumetric 3D Display

This apparatus forms a large volumetric 3D graphics display by projecting a small volumetric display onto a large screen that is moving with inherent synchronization with the small 3D image. A coherent bundle of fiber optics transforms digitized data from a line to a plane, and each plane is projected by lens to a screen that traverses a larger volume.

The concept for the input technology is based on U. S. Patent No. 3,604,780. The present design achieves larger images on the order of cubic feet, a reduced number of moving parts, a wider variety of input techniques, and presents a viewing area of a full sphere.

Fig. 1 shows the basic input grid and illustrates the X/Y/Z locations to present light points that are to form the required volumetric picture.

Fig. 1A shows the object to be encoded. Fig. 1B shows the image created. The object in Fig. 1A is measured and scaled to the desired ratio for the display volume. The correct (X-1)(Y-2)(Z-3) coordinates are selected and the necessary points are presented on the grid 4 for transference to the viewing volume (Fig. 1B). In essence the fiber-optic face presents a Z-plane at a time. The image planes cycle at a rate of speed allowing a persistence of vision to observe all points in the volume simultaneously.

The static input for the projected image in Fig. 2 reads the input information from the fiber-optic face 5 and displays the desired image 6 in the viewing volumetric space 7. There is a lens 8 positioned in front of the fiber-optic face 5 that takes the image and projects it onto the sliding screen...