Browse Prior Art Database

On Chip Voltage Regulator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086888D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Chin, W: AUTHOR

Abstract

This on-chip voltage regulator circuit sinks large transient current which is caused by the voltage doubling effect at the end of an unterminated transmission line. The output level of the voltage regulator can be designed to a desired level by either altering the size of the devices or by varying the number of the devices.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 95% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

On Chip Voltage Regulator

This on-chip voltage regulator circuit sinks large transient current which is caused by the voltage doubling effect at the end of an unterminated transmission line. The output level of the voltage regulator can be designed to a desired level by either altering the size of the devices or by varying the number of the devices.

As shown in Figs. 1A and 1B, to clamp the voltage overshoot by using the on-chip generated voltage regulator has the following advantages:

1. The voltage clamping level can be designed, as required, to eliminate an additional power supply.

2. It minimizes the power supply noise on chip. If the +3V was used for clamping, large noise spike could occur on the power bus.

3. It minimizes the chip area, since no wide busses are needed for the +3V to carry the large surge transient current.

4. It minimizes the Delta I problem for the +3V on chip.

The circuit output voltage levels are determined as follows:
Vout (Fig. 1A) = VBE(TF) + VBE(TD) + VBE(TB) + VBE(TC) + VBE(TA) - VBE(TE).

Vout (Fig. 1B) = VBE(TG) + VBE(TE) - VBE(TB) - VBE(TD) - VBE(TA) - VBE(TC) - VBE(TF).

Device TF of Fig. 1A and TG of Fig. 1B are large devices. Each will sink large surge current when the voltage at the end of an unterminated transmission line is doubled. Base current of TF (Fig.1A) and TG (Fig.1B) are provided by TD and TE, respectively. However, the output levels are regulated through a series device TA-TD in Fig. 1A and TA-TE in Fig. 1B, respecti...