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"KEY" Security Method for Cryptographic Systems

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086917D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 40K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Terlep, KD: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The need for security in computer systems and in personal "data banks" in particular has become obvious. A promising technique to ensure security consists of enciphering information with the use of a personal "key" (a string of binary bits) at the sending station and deciphering the cryptographically transformed information with an inverse key at the receiving station.

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"KEY" Security Method for Cryptographic Systems

The need for security in computer systems and in personal "data banks" in particular has become obvious. A promising technique to ensure security consists of enciphering information with the use of a personal "key" (a string of binary bits) at the sending station and deciphering the cryptographically transformed information with an inverse key at the receiving station.

In order to maximize security of the overall cryptographic system, it is necessary to ensure that the "key" cannot be determined by an individual who wishes to "break" the system. Additionally, the "key" must be maintained in a nonvolatile technology to ensure its maintenance in case of power loss.

The magnetic bubble technology with an independent magnetic bias structure provides the "key" nonvolatility and the "key" destruction when hardware is disrupted in an attempt to examine the module containing the "key" information. The nonvolatility is ensured when the magnetic bias field consisting of the permanent magnetic structure 10 (Figs. 1 and 2) is provided for the magnetic bubble "key" module. The magnetic bubble module 12, containing the "key" to be protected, is placed on a field replaceable unit (FRU) which is independent of the magnetic bias structure which provides Hz. Use would be as follows: 1. With the FRU in place in the system, the "key" is written into the magnetic bubble module (serially or in parallel depending upon design). "Key" outpu...