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Coded Sphere Joystick

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086943D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 46K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Carmichael, MW: AUTHOR

Abstract

An exploded view of a joystick and encoder is shown in Fig. 1. A sphere is mounted in a gimbal ring 3, which in turn is pivotally mounted in a frame 4. Rotation of the sphere 2 in the gimbal ring 3 represents movement about an "X" axis, while rotation of the gimbal ring 3 with respect to the frame 4 represents movement about a "Y" axis.

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Coded Sphere Joystick

An exploded view of a joystick and encoder is shown in Fig. 1. A sphere is mounted in a gimbal ring 3, which in turn is pivotally mounted in a frame 4. Rotation of the sphere 2 in the gimbal ring 3 represents movement about an "X" axis, while rotation of the gimbal ring 3 with respect to the frame 4 represents movement about a "Y" axis.

The angular position of the sphere 2 and gimbal ring 3 is encoded to represent the X and Y coordinates, respectively, of the joystick. Encoding the X coordinate is achieved by optically detecting a pattern of nonreflective rings 5 on the underside of sphere 2 using three light switches 6. The light switches 6 are mounted close to sphere 2 and are spaced so that the relationship between the position of the switches 6 and the nonreflective rings 5 produce a coded signal, in this example a three-bit Gray code, representing the angular position of sphere 2. Encoding the Y coordinate is achieved by optically detecting nonreflective pattern 7 on a vane 8. The vane 8 is attached to and rotates with gimbal ring 3. The nonreflective pattern 7 is detected by three light switches 9 mounted close to vane 8 and spaced so that the relationship between the position of the switches 9 and the nonreflective pattern 7 produce a coded signal, a three-bit code in this case, representing the angular position of gimbal ring 3.

Each of the light switches may consist of a photodiode 11 and light-emitting diode 12, as shown in Fig. 2....