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Depositing Photoresist in Thin Layers Independent of Surface Area

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086951D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hochberg, F: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This method provides the following: 1. Good distribution of photoresist. 2. Filtering system which is inherent in the method used to nebulize the photoresist. 3. Better coverage of nonplanar areas on the surface of the substrate. 4. No waste of photoresist. Theoretically, this method can deposit 1000 cc of photoresist on 10,000,000 cm/2/ surface area equivalent to 2.5 x 10/5/, 3" diameter wafers, as compared to 1000, 3" diameter wafers with the existing methods.

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Depositing Photoresist in Thin Layers Independent of Surface Area

This method provides the following:

1. Good distribution of photoresist.

2. Filtering system which is inherent in the method used to

nebulize the photoresist.

3. Better coverage of nonplanar areas on the surface of the

substrate.

4. No waste of photoresist. Theoretically, this method can deposit 1000 cc of photoresist on 10,000,000 cm/2/ surface area equivalent to
2.5 x 10/5/, 3" diameter wafers, as compared to 1000, 3" diameter wafers with the existing methods.

The photoresist is broken up into small particles with the aid of an ultrasonic nebulizer, the higher the ultrasonic frequency the smaller the particle size.

The surface of the wafer is statically charged, attracting the nebulized photoresist. The thickness deposited is a function of the time exposed to the mist as well as of the attraction of the photoresist to the substrate. Both the time and the static charge can be controlled so that the thickness can be accurately controlled.

With dielectrics, e.g., Sin , the charge on the substrate can be varied across the surface of the substrate and the deposit can also be changed to correct possible distribution problems which become more pronounced when the substrates become larger, or the charge can be varied such that the deposition takes the form of a spatial pattern.

Another method of depositing the photoresist is spraying. This method consists of sending the mist through a tube with a slit th...