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Fabrication of Dense Arrays of Nozzles and Channels With High Degree of Precision

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086953D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 81K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Bassous, E: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This is a process for fabricating dense arrays of ink jet nozzles utilizing conventional silicon device batch-processing techniques, with, in one instance, the individual nozzles being formed directly in the silicon, and in a second instance with glass capillaries forming the individual nozzles in the array. Silicon substrates of distinct crystallographic orientation are anisotropically etched to form grooves of known geometry. The etched surfaces are bonded to one another or to planar surfaces using fused glass with, in the first instance, the bonded grooves forming the individual nozzles, and, in the second instance, a capillary being fused in a groove for forming an individual nozzle. The resulting structure is sliced perpendicular to the direction of the grooves.

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Fabrication of Dense Arrays of Nozzles and Channels With High Degree of Precision

This is a process for fabricating dense arrays of ink jet nozzles utilizing conventional silicon device batch-processing techniques, with, in one instance, the individual nozzles being formed directly in the silicon, and in a second instance with glass capillaries forming the individual nozzles in the array. Silicon substrates of distinct crystallographic orientation are anisotropically etched to form grooves of known geometry. The etched surfaces are bonded to one another or to planar surfaces using fused glass with, in the first instance, the bonded grooves forming the individual nozzles, and, in the second instance, a capillary being fused in a groove for forming an individual nozzle. The resulting structure is sliced perpendicular to the direction of the grooves. The process provides a plurality of arrays with a high density of reproducible uniform nozzles of precise dimensions, which results in greater wear resistance and longer life. Charge plates may be fabricated on the silicon substrates of the array.

Fig. 1 illustrates the geometrical shapes obtained by etching holes or grooves in (100) and (110) oriented single crystal silicon. Of particular interest is the well- defined profile of the etched surface which is bounded by the slowest etching (111) planes which form an angle of 54.7 degrees (Fig. 1A) with the horizontal in the case of (100) silicon and at an angle of 90 degrees (Fig. 1E) with (110) silicon. If V-shaped grooves are etched in (100) silicon, the width to depth ratio is 10:7.

In order to fabricate arrays of nozzles or tunnnels, it is necessary. to laminate or cement a flat smooth surface to a silicon wafer which has parallel trenches etched into its surface. The resulting structure may be sliced in a direction perpendicular to the direction of the trenches to yield the required array of nozzles. Examples of the types of arrays possible with this method are shown in Figs. 2A-C, Fig. 4A-C, and Fig. 5A-C. A different geometry is possible if the second wafer is also etched to form similar or different trenches. By aligning two etched wafers, arrays such as those shown in Fig. 2D-F, Fig. 3A-C, and Fig. 4D- F can be obtained.

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