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Casting Narrow Tubulations in Polymeric Materials

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000086967D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Srinivasan, R.: AUTHOR

Abstract

It is possible to form narrow (down to 1 mil) channels in polymeric materials in lengths that are limited only by production facilities by use of the following process. The polymer used can be polymerized at room temperature (<30 degrees), although after processing it can be heated to its decomposition limit. The cores for the channels are formed by condensing sucrose into a ductile material in the presence of an acidic catalyst at 155 degrees and drawing a thread of the requisite diameter from this material. In a suitable mold, the monomer is poured around the core and polymerized. The sucrose polymer is subsequently dissolved out with cold or boiling water.

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Casting Narrow Tubulations in Polymeric Materials

It is possible to form narrow (down to 1 mil) channels in polymeric materials in lengths that are limited only by production facilities by use of the following process. The polymer used can be polymerized at room temperature (<30 degrees), although after processing it can be heated to its decomposition limit. The cores for the channels are formed by condensing sucrose into a ductile material in the presence of an acidic catalyst at 155 degrees and drawing a thread of the requisite diameter from this material. In a suitable mold, the monomer is poured around the core and polymerized. The sucrose polymer is subsequently dissolved out with cold or boiling water.

The process provides a single channel (Example 1), multichannels (Example
2), or a network of interconnected capillaries in a bulk material (Example 3). The channels assume the shape of the core (usually circular in cross-section) but some shrinkage of the polymer which occurs during setting leads to an expansion in the size of the channel. Any water-insoluble polymer can be used to form the thread. The sucrose polymer is insoluble in all nonpolar or slightly polar organic materials.

The process is applicable to producing shock-resistant, flexible, narrow channels, pores, and spongy material. The samples were made with a silicone polymer. Since this material is compatible with biological systems, applications in biomedicine can be contemplated.

Example 1: A s...