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Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Forming Phase Lines

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087053D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Garnache, RR: AUTHOR

Abstract

This describes a novel method for fabricating close packed conductive phase lines for use on charge transfer device arrays. It eliminates the sensitivity to overlay and to etch bias, and thus avoids the necessity of overlap in the phase lines because of misalignment or overetching of the lines during their production.

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Method for Forming Phase Lines

This describes a novel method for fabricating close packed conductive phase lines for use on charge transfer device arrays. It eliminates the sensitivity to overlay and to etch bias, and thus avoids the necessity of overlap in the phase lines because of misalignment or overetching of the lines during their production.

The process is as follows: One set of phase lines 10 (lines 10a and 10b being shown) are formed in the standard manner over an oxide layer 11 deposited on a silicon wafer 12. Phase lines 10 are generally formed of polysilicon and are deposited, delineated, and oxidized with an oxide layer 13 so that the phase lines are encapsulated with the insulating film 13. The entire unit is then coated with a blanket 14 of polysilicon doped P-type to the order of 10/18/ per cc. Once this blanket layer of polysilicon 14 is deposited, the surface is coated with a material, such as photoresist 15, which will flow uniformly across the surface and form a generally planarized surface 16.

The unit having the planarized surface 16 created thereon is then exposed to a suitable ion beam having energies sufficient to cause the ions in the beam to penetrate the thin portion of the photoresist 16 overlying the phase lines 10a and 10b but not sufficient to penetrate the thicker photoresist lying between the phase lines 10a and 10b. Because the ion beam will readily penetrate through the thinner regions of the photoresist layer 16, the ions will be subsequently lodged in the portions of the blanket layer 14 immediately overlying the phase lines 10a as indicated by the numerals 14a and 14b overlying the phase lines 10a and 10b, respectively. Because the ions do not have suffic...