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Lottery Ticket

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087064D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Lagoe, DJ: AUTHOR

Abstract

One of the commonly used types of lottery ticket involves printing information, such as one or more numbers, and then overprinting these numbers with a block of special, highly opaque covering material which can be easily removed to expose the number. The number indicates whether or not the ticket is a "winner". One can determine whether or not a particular ticket is a winner by removing the opaque ink.

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Lottery Ticket

One of the commonly used types of lottery ticket involves printing information, such as one or more numbers, and then overprinting these numbers with a block of special, highly opaque covering material which can be easily removed to expose the number. The number indicates whether or not the ticket is a "winner". One can determine whether or not a particular ticket is a winner by removing the opaque ink.

The technique described here allows one to fabricate similar tickets without the need for first printing a number and then overprinting the number with opaque material. This approach involves making the ticket from an image-producing or action paper. All printing on the ticket other than the "winning number" can be done in a manner identical to the old type of ticket. The opaque wash-off block is also printed on the form, but no winning (decision) number is printed on the form before the opaque material is applied.

After the forms have been fabricated, the desired set of "win" or "decision" numbers is printed on the forms over the opaque block; however, the printing is done with no ribbon or with an uninked ribbon. The characters which are so printed would not be visible until the opaque material is washed off, thereby exposing the image which was generated by the image-producing paper.

The action paper could be polyethylene coated to resist ink effects. If the opaque block ink is not compatible with the polyethylene surface, one could use a press v...