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Purification of Nonpolar Organic Liquids

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087073D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Dec-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Frieser, RG: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

In liquid-cooled semiconductor packages, a typical nonpolar organic liquid for use as a coolant is perfluorohexane. For this application the material must be ultra-pure since even parts per billion of some contaminants have been found to be detrimental when present as a constituent in the perfluorohexane. There are several origins of these contaminants: (a) residue from manufacturing processes, (b) inadvertent contamination during storage prior to final application, and (c) contamination during use.

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Purification of Nonpolar Organic Liquids

In liquid-cooled semiconductor packages, a typical nonpolar organic liquid for use as a coolant is perfluorohexane. For this application the material must be ultra-pure since even parts per billion of some contaminants have been found to be detrimental when present as a constituent in the perfluorohexane. There are several origins of these contaminants: (a) residue from manufacturing processes,
(b) inadvertent contamination during storage prior to final application, and (c) contamination during use.

The present techniques of purification are based on a column packed with charcoal. The technique presents the risk of contamination from inorganic materials or corrosive gases possibly contained in the charcoal.

In this technique, a column is packed with a material identified as CORNING 7930* (approximately 400 sieve) particles. The perfluorohexane is slowly flowed through the column. This material is a borosilicate glass with approximately 250 sq. meters per gram of surface area. The material has a large number of pores or holes approximately 40 Angstroms in diameter and very long. It is theorized that these holes or pores trap the contaminants, particularly the polar organic contaminants, when these molecules enter the pores by either physical entrapment, hydrogen bonding, or electrostatic attraction. The nonpolar perfluorohexane molecule is unaffected. Other foreign molecules may also form an ionic bond with the material and...