Browse Prior Art Database

Color Coded Kanji Pattern Recognition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087236D
Original Publication Date: 1976-Nov-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Pavanati, G: AUTHOR

Abstract

Color is introduced in the Kanji pattern as a way to simplify the recognition process with optical-scanning techniques.

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At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
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Color Coded Kanji Pattern Recognition

Color is introduced in the Kanji pattern as a way to simplify the recognition process with optical-scanning techniques.

A key problem with Kanji pattern recognition is the complexity of the pattern. However, simpler subpatterns within the body of the character (features) carry enough intelligence to uniquely identify the character. A class of features is the stroke set used to construct the character. The entire stroke set used in the composition of Kanji characters consists of about 25 elementary patterns. A table of elementary strokes is given below.

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Optical scanning techniques aiming at stroke analysis are difficult to implement because individual strokes are, in principle, indistinguishable within the body of the character. A suitable way to preserve stroke identity is to "color" individual strokes. For example, the Kanji character

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is written using the following elementary strokes:

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By coloring individual strokes, the optical recognition process can be simplified into a threestep sequence. (1) Stroke separation based on color code. (2) Stroke recognition. (3) Character identification based on stroke intelligence.

Once individual strokes are recognized and classified according to their pattern, characters can be identified using relational intelligence among strokes. A most useful relation among strokes is stroke intersection.

In summary, the following three parameters may be sufficient to identify Kanji characters. (1) Stroke count (2) Stroke type (3) Stroke intersection.

The practical implementation of this invention with handwriting (KAISHO style) is achieved by using a pen or pencil which automatically changes color at the writing of each stroke. The color changing mechanism is not related to any parti...