Browse Prior Art Database

Universal Probe Point

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087250D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ludeman, CP: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This device reduces servicing time for data processing equipment. Many times during failure diagnosis and servicing of data processing equipment the customer engineer (CE) is required to manually probe a point to determine its electrical state. This information is then used to determine the next branch or step in the maintenance routine. The general logic probe (GLP) has the capability of determining a number of states (Logic Up, Logic Down, Pulsing Up, Pulsing Down) for a variety of different technologies, e.g., MST1, TTL, SLT, SLD and FET. Under current systems of automatic diagnosing, the CE is required to probe, make a decision, and manually input this information into the system. This is only required if the particular electrical point of concern is not available for automatic sensing.

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Universal Probe Point

This device reduces servicing time for data processing equipment. Many times during failure diagnosis and servicing of data processing equipment the customer engineer (CE) is required to manually probe a point to determine its electrical state. This information is then used to determine the next branch or step in the maintenance routine. The general logic probe (GLP) has the capability of determining a number of states (Logic Up, Logic Down, Pulsing Up, Pulsing Down) for a variety of different technologies, e.g., MST1, TTL, SLT, SLD and FET. Under current systems of automatic diagnosing, the CE is required to probe, make a decision, and manually input this information into the system. This is only required if the particular electrical point of concern is not available for automatic sensing. This manual action is time consuming and subject to human error.

As shown in Figs. 1 and 2, the universal probe 1 may be plugged into any one of many identical probe points 2 located in logic gates 3-5 throughout the system. The purpose of probe 1 and its associated circuitry is to provide automatic logic state analysis and resultant automatic selection of the next branch or step in the maintenance routine. In current systems of automatic diagnosing, the CE may be given manual directions by way of prompts displayed on the system CRT display or printer. These prompts would include the location of the specific point to be probed and the setting of the techn...