Dismiss
InnovationQ will be updated on Sunday, Oct. 22, from 10am ET - noon. You may experience brief service interruptions during that time.
Browse Prior Art Database

Phonetic Grammatic Keyboard Device

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087262D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 5 page(s) / 96K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ludeman, CP: AUTHOR

Abstract

Word processing keyboard devices, such as typewriters, text terminals, etc., may be constrained by input speed. This limitation is different for each operator and is determined primarily by skill in manipulating the keys for the upper- and lower-case grammatic alphabet. The manipulation of keys for other characters (numbers, special characters, etc.) influences this limitation but to a far lesser degree. The mechanical and design attributes of modern grammatic keyboard devices have been optimized to the point where little input speed improvement can be anticipated in the future. Historically, the input speed has been increased with improvements, such as electrical key/print mechanisms, human-factor-designed keyboards, etc., to the point where 60 words per minute is a common average for a production office environment.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 39% of the total text.

Page 1 of 5

Phonetic Grammatic Keyboard Device

Word processing keyboard devices, such as typewriters, text terminals, etc., may be constrained by input speed. This limitation is different for each operator and is determined primarily by skill in manipulating the keys for the upper- and lower-case grammatic alphabet. The manipulation of keys for other characters (numbers, special characters, etc.) influences this limitation but to a far lesser degree. The mechanical and design attributes of modern grammatic keyboard devices have been optimized to the point where little input speed improvement can be anticipated in the future. Historically, the input speed has been increased with improvements, such as electrical key/print mechanisms, human-factor- designed keyboards, etc., to the point where 60 words per minute is a common average for a production office environment. This increase in input speed has been completely overshadowed by modern technology's advances in the printing and processing of text. Contemporary hardware is capable of printing text at thousands of words per minute and processing text at millions of words per minute.

In order to narrow this gap the basic grammatic alphabet must be examined and a different philosophy of text input developed. One possible philosophy is the use of a "phonetic" alphabet as the input "form" for text processing. In general, phonetic languages eliminate those characters which are not a contributing part of the word sound to the point where a word is defined using the minimum number of characters. In addition, extensive use of abbreviations (to shorten words, represent punctuation, etc.) and elimination of similar sounding characters (S & Z, C & K, etc.) are utilized.

A contemporary phonetic alphabet and keyboard is shown in Fig. 1a. The phonetic alphabet used by this keyboard contains a total of 16 unique alphabetic graphics (S,T,P,H,F,L,D,K,W,R,B,G,A,O,E,U). No special characters (punctuation, special symbols, etc.) are used.

The 16 unique graphics are used to form a total of 21 characters by allowing the same unique graphic to represent more than one character (as with S, T, P and R). Each of the 21 characters is columnized and has a fixed horizontal relationship (left to right) with all other characters. This is illustrated as follows: Column Number 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 Character
S T K P W H R A O * E U F R P
B L G T S D S * Column 10 is devoted to a CORRECTION symbol and should be ignored. As an example, the leftmost T always appears in the column between the leftmost S and the K. The single syllable word TAP would appear as: T A P A phonetic syllable is formed by the simultaneous depression of one or more keys (stroke) with the appropriate printout or display. A phonetic word can consist of one or more phonetic syllables with each syllable requiring a single stroke. As an example, the word ORCHID would appear as two phonetic syllables: O R

1

Page 2 of 5

K E U D Ref...