Browse Prior Art Database

Electronic Automatic Number Identification Circuits

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087273D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 3 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brady, RL: AUTHOR

Abstract

Most automatic dial systems share the use of the switching equipment in the telephone central office. The switching equipment is used to provide a multiplicity of connecting paths, as well as control and decode functions, for dialed calls. The originator of a call (calling party) is normally charged for the call. It is necessary for the direct distance dial equipment to obtain (1) the called number, (2) the starting time of the call, (3) the duration of the call, (4) the class of service, (5) the time of day and (6) to be able to identify the calling number for the assignment of charges. Items 1 through 5 are normally obtained by connecting at some central point in the telephone office where all outgoing calls are grouped together.

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Electronic Automatic Number Identification Circuits

Most automatic dial systems share the use of the switching equipment in the telephone central office. The switching equipment is used to provide a multiplicity of connecting paths, as well as control and decode functions, for dialed calls. The originator of a call (calling party) is normally charged for the call. It is necessary for the direct distance dial equipment to obtain (1) the called number, (2) the starting time of the call, (3) the duration of the call, (4) the class of service, (5) the time of day and (6) to be able to identify the calling number for the assignment of charges.

Items 1 through 5 are normally obtained by connecting at some central point in the telephone office where all outgoing calls are grouped together. However, item 6 may arrive at this central grouping through a multiplicity of different paths. It is necessary, therefore, to provide a means of tracing the call path back through a central office from the centralized toll recording equipment attachment point to a point where the calling number can be identified without ambiguity.

Existing automatic number identification (ANI) equipment requires multiple connections to the telephone system and a multiplicity of wires to insert a signal at the toll recording attachment point and to retrieve the inserted signal from the input connecting frame. These latter connections can be up to 10,000 wires from a considerable distance.

Several methods are proposed that involve a signal sent out from a central point and that make use of existing circuits to conduct a response back to a shared circuit or device. This system can also be extended to use for identifying multiparty line users by placing the responder at the telephone set.

In Fig. 1, a centralized controller 1 and remote transponders, such as transponders 2 and 3, provide the identification function by conducting a control signal and the identification response over the Tip and Ring signal wires (Fig. 2) which are assigned to the call. The Tip and Ring signal wires provide a low-loss audio path which threads through the multiplicity of switching equipment in the telephone circuit. Controller 1 is provided wit...