Browse Prior Art Database

Photoconductor Erase

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087287D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 4 page(s) / 76K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Branham, CE: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

In the copier of Fig. 1, photoconductor drum 10 is first charged at charge station 11, as the drum rotates in a clockwise direction. Thereafter, the "working area" portion of the photoconductor drum is discharged by the reflected image 12 of an original document 13.

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Photoconductor Erase

In the copier of Fig. 1, photoconductor drum 10 is first charged at charge station 11, as the drum rotates in a clockwise direction. Thereafter, the "working area" portion of the photoconductor drum is discharged by the reflected image 12 of an original document 13.

With reference to Fig. 2, drum 10 is shown in an unrolled state. For a large original document, the working area is area N, F, J, 0. For a small original document, the working area is E, F, H, G.

As can be seen, these original documents have a common reference corner F.

Referring again to Fig. 1, the copier includes primary and secondary paper bins 14 and 15, respectively. Adjacent each of these bins are paper-size buttons 16, designating which of the two paper sizes, i.e., N, F, J, 0 or E, F, H, G, is currently resident in the bin. This paper is selectively supplied to the copier's transfer station 17. Thus, for example, the upper of these two buttons designates the small size sheet E, F, H, G, whereas the lower of these buttons designates the larger sheet N, F, J, 0.

Since the entire surface of the photoconductor is charged at charge station 11, the photoconductor portion surrounding its working area must be discharged by the interimage and end erase lamps 47 prior to the passage of the photoconductor through developer 18. At this developer, toner is deposited on the original document's latent image resident within the photoconductor's working area. As seen in Fig. 2, interimage erase lamp 19 is a single lamp which spans the entire length of the photoconductor. The end erase lamps comprise three separate lamps 20, 21 and 22. Interimage erase lamp 19 is controlled to erase the area D, A', B', L.

Paper-size buttons 16 control a lamp on/off control network 23 in a manner to cause lamp 19 to erase either area A, M, P, B or area A, C, K, B.

End erase lamp 20 is energized continuously. Lamps 19, 21 and 22 are variably controlled by paper-size buttons 16, within the photoconductor area A, A', B, B'.

In addition, the copier of Fig. 1 is provided with three toner detecting photocells, located downstream of transfer station 17, and prior to photoconductor cleaner 24. As shown in Fig. 2, these toner detecting photocells comprise three photocells 25, 26 and 27. These three photocells cooperate with three light sources (not shown) which direct light toward the photoconductor, such that a relatively large amount of light will be reflected off a clear photoconductor onto the photocell. However, if a black toner band resides on the photocell, then the reflectance is a minimum.

Photocell 25 views generally the photoconductor band A, A', T, Q. Photocell 26 views generally the photoconductor band R, U, V, S. Photocell 27 views generall...