Browse Prior Art Database

Wave Solder Nozzle

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000087313D
Original Publication Date: 1977-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Mar-03
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Mooney, TJ: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Wave soldering of high lead solders, e.g., 10/90 (10% tin by weight and 90% lead by weight), has previously been considered infeasible because the process has generated large amounts of dross. Dross formation is largely a function of the bath temperature and the degree of exposure to air, e.g., a fast moving wave falling 0.5 inches would generate more dross than a slow moving wave falling 0.25 inches.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 100% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Wave Solder Nozzle

Wave soldering of high lead solders, e.g., 10/90 (10% tin by weight and 90% lead by weight), has previously been considered infeasible because the process has generated large amounts of dross. Dross formation is largely a function of the bath temperature and the degree of exposure to air, e.g., a fast moving wave falling 0.5 inches would generate more dross than a slow moving wave falling
0.25 inches.

Design of a wave solder nozzle that would drastically reduce the degree of dross produced is more a matter of trial and error than of precise calculation. Given a small wave fall and a slow moving wave, dross can be reduced. However, a major positive factor associated with the present nozzle design is the apparent formation of an oxide skin on the wave surface and the visibly faster movement of the underlying molten 10/90 solder. The shape of the nozzle is considered to be the chief contributor to this unique and beneficial effect.

The difference in structure in cross-section of a standard nozzle and the present new design is shown schematically in the drawing. The new design tends to baffle the solder flow in a different manner and consistently outperforms the standard nozzle, especially at low pump speed, on a dross formation basis.

1

Page 2 of 2

2

[This page contains 2 pictures or other non-text objects]